5 newborn portraits you must take during the first 2 weeks

  • dad holding newborn photo by Beth Deschamp

5 newborn portraits you must take during the first 2 weeks

Expectant parents are commonly told to savor every single moment with their little ones, as time goes by too fast and they will grow before you know it.

It’s hard to imagine them being anything but tiny when you are holding them for the first time in your arms but, in a blink of an eye, they are quickly growing and you are begging time to slow down.

Well, time sure won’t slow down, but you can freeze it in time… through photographs. And because your new baby will start changing quickly during the first two weeks after birth, you are going to want to capture that brand newness right away. Amongst those few roles of photographs that you take, be sure that you capture these five portraits during the first two weeks.

1. A hospital portrait

When you are packing that hospital bag that you will take with you to the hospital, be sure your camera is tucked in there along with that adorable newborn onesie that your baby will wear home. Trust me, you will thank yourself later for including your camera amongst your hospital necessities.

After you meet your tiny baby, and after a little rest, be sure to take a portrait of your baby in the hospital where they were born. This photo will show that brand newness of your newborn and, in reality, they will never be as little again as they are in that single photo. So swaddle them up, place them in their hospital bassinet, and click away!

black and white photo of newborn in hospital bed by Beth Deschamp

2. A detailed portrait

While you are taking photo after photo of their precious face, don’t forget the tiny details! From their teeny tiny fingernails to their sweet little toes, be sure to capture some photographs of all the sweet little things about your new baby. Whether it is in the hospital or when you arrive home, either lay your baby safely in a crib or on your bed for an easy way to capture those details. Taking them out of their swaddle and letting their little feet dance for you is a great tip for capturing some natural and candid photos. Laying them on a neutral blanket will also help simplify the photos, keeping the focus on the sweet little subject.

Related: 10 tips for photographing your own newborn

newborn feet picture by Beth Deschamp

3. A mommy and baby portrait

While the last thing you may want to do after giving birth is get in front of the camera, it’s a must-have photograph. If waiting until you are home to get in front of the camera is a more comfortable thought, that’s okay! Just be sure to do it. Put aside your hesitations, pick up your sweet baby and capture the moment of you both together.

Whether you hand your husband the camera or you set that self-timer, be sure to get a photo of you with your baby too! As children grow up, they are fascinated by portraits of themselves that were taken when they were babies. They are even more fascinated by what their parents looked like at the time. So, if not for you, do it for your baby. They will love you for it.

mom and newborn portrait by Beth Deschamp

Be sure to also get a photo of your new baby with their daddy! He has watched you carry your baby for nine whole months, so finally being able to hold your child in his arms is a very special moment for him.

Related: How to photograph baby’s first year

dad holding newborn photo by Beth Deschamp

4. A nursery portrait

You’ve worked so hard on creating your baby’s nursery, while paying attention to every little detail from the crib bedding to the wall color. Be sure to take a photo of your brand new baby in their brand new room. Taking a pullback photo is a great way to get a photo of your little one, while capturing the details of the nursery. Pullback photos are also a great idea because they show your baby in a surrounding environment, which is a great way of putting into perspective just how little your baby truly is in comparison to their room.

If you are going to walk away from your newborn to take a photo, be sure to have someone else near your newborn to ensure their safety. Even though your baby may be little, they are still strong. Make sure you have a spotter near your baby during those times when you want to photograph from further away.

new baby laying on a changing table by Beth Deschamp

5. A crib portrait

Even though they probably won’t be sleeping in their room by themselves for a little while, lay them in their crib sometime within those first two weeks for a quick portrait. Just like with the nursery photo, putting your newborn in their crib is another great way of capturing a photo that shows just how small they truly are in comparison to their crib. You can photograph from the side of the crib or from above, and both are a great opportunity to get a photo of your baby from head to toe, which is a great way of capturing how long they are.

Related: 11 pictures to take of your baby in the first month

baby laying in his crib in the nursery by Beth Deschamp

During those first two weeks of birth, your baby will change so much! Day by day, they will start growing and taking on more of a personality. As you are adjusting to life with a new little one, be sure you take the opportunity to photograph these photos during the first couple of weeks. Not only will you be capturing that brand newness of your tiny baby, but you will always be forever thankful that you did. They will never be that little again, so keep that camera battery charged. There is no such thing as too many photographs!

Save

About the Author:

Meet Beth Deschamp of {beth} a-dilly photography. This curly haired blonde and blue-eyed girl is most content when she is making memories with her little family. She is married to the boy who had a high school locker next to hers and is a small town girl living in the big city of Washington DC with her hubby and two puppies. Starbucks iced soy chai, paperback books, Instagram, almond vanilla cupcakes, blogging, a glass of bold red wine and snuggling a puppy in her lap are just a few of her most favorite things. On a typical weekend, you can find her in the passenger seat, riding down the backroads of Virginia wine country with the windows rolled down and country tunes turned up, stopping on the side of the road from time to time to capture something beautiful with her Nikon D610. As this teacher turned photographer just celebrated her second year in business, her favorite thing about being a photographer is being able to portray the beauty of ordinary things in everyday life. Becoming a photographer has helped her to see the beauty in the littlest of things. And that is a life lesson she will always be grateful for. Visit Beth Deschamp online.
FOLLOW :

8 Comments

  1. Liz Paccione Oct 13 2015 at 8:54 am - Reply

    Beth…I just adore your photography. So bright, fresh and creative. Your Instagram photos are always inspiring.

  2. Megan Cieloha Oct 13 2015 at 4:38 pm - Reply

    So sweet, clean and fresh! These are great tips, Beth!

  3. Abbe McCracken Oct 14 2015 at 10:48 am - Reply

    I love this Beth! Thank you for sharing

  4. Liz Oct 22 2015 at 11:01 pm - Reply

    Great post Beth!

  5. Matt Selby Photography Dec 18 2015 at 6:49 am - Reply

    Nice article. I’m expecting my 1st child in the summer, and I dont think I’ll be able to put my camera down once he/she arrives! – Are the nurses generally ok with me taking shots during the birth?

    • April Nienhuis Dec 18 2015 at 11:10 am - Reply

      Matt, it’s really up to the doctor and usually they’re fine with it. The only exception might be if she ends up needing a c-section, then you’d need to check with the doctor and anesthesiologist. Congratulations on your first little one!

  6. Cindy J. Coffey Mar 13 2016 at 1:20 am - Reply

    So useful article! All parents need to read it! Thank you so much for your sharing!

  7. Glenn Mather May 13 2018 at 10:47 am - Reply

    Beautiful work, my children are somewhat older now, but these photos bring back such wonderful memories of the day they were born!

Leave A Comment

Follow

Follow this blog

Email address