Bringing a new baby into your family is one of life’s most amazing and wonderful moments!

The newborn days are so precious, yet so fleeting. As photographers, we can appreciate how quickly these days go by and how important it is to capture all of the sweet details of our new babies, while they are still little.

While some may opt to hire a professional to photograph their baby, some of us are excited at the prospect of capturing our baby’s first days ourselves. My 10th child, Gabriel, was born on June 24th of this year, and I was determined to get some amazing photos of him myself.

I would love to share with you some tips and ideas to help you create beautiful images of your own baby and to make this experience an enjoyable and stress-free one for the both of you.

1. Pace yourself!

One of the benefits of photographing your own newborn is that time is on your side.  Unlike shooting a newborn session for a client and having a 3-4 hour window in which to work and create a varied gallery, you have days – weeks even – at your disposal.  Remember that you just had a baby!  You need to take time for yourself to rest and recover from the childbirth experience, so please do not rush and try to do everything in one day.  I have learned the hard way that this will end in exhaustion and frustration.  When I had Gabriel, I would shoot for a short period of time using just one or two setups every other day or so.  Not only did this keep everything low stress, but it allowed me to capture the subtle changes as Gabriel changed over his first few weeks of life.  Contrary to what you may have heard about the first 2 weeks being the best time to photograph a newborn, it is very possible to photograph older babies in the ‘newborn style’ as well.  I was still capturing Gabriel’s newborn photos when he was over a month old.  Remember, time is on your side!  Take it easy and don’t over-do it.   If you pace yourself, you can capture an amazing variety of images of your sweet new baby.

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

2. Lighting is everything!

One of the most common mistakes I see in newborn photography from pros and amateurs alike is improper lighting.  If I had a dollar for every up-lit baby I saw floating around online, I’d be a very rich woman.  Whether you’re photographing for a client or for yourself, one of the things that can make or break a photo is your lighting.  Think about the most natural source of lighting we have – the sun.  It is in the sky above us.  Therefore, seeing a person who is lit from below is very unnatural looking.  It is so unnatural looking that it is often seen in horror movies or to depict something frightening.  We definitely do not want our baby to look like they belong in a horror flick!  You do not need any fancy studio equipment to get this right.  Almost all of the photos I took of Gabriel were done either in my garage or in front of one of my living room windows utilizing natural light.  A good rule of thumb for nice soft shadows and highlights is to have your baby angled such that the light flows from the top of baby’s head on down their body at approximately a 45 degree angle.  Look for a soft shadow underneath baby’s nose to verify that you have this right.  Feel free to experiment – for more dramatic lighting and shadowing as in the photo of my husband’s hands holding Gabriel in the photo above, go for a more drastic angle.  Have fun playing with different angles and perspectives, but do not, I repeat, do NOT up-light your baby!

Related: 11 pictures to take of your baby in the first month

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

3. Keep baby happy and you’ll be happy too!

There are a few simple things you can do that will ensure a happy baby and a productive photo session.  The first is to keep your shooting area warm – really warm.  I have successfully used my quartz infrared space heater that we use to heat our bedroom in the wintertime, but any small space heater will do.  The alternative is to crank up the thermostat in your house while you are shooting.  Luckily, Gabriel was born during the summer in Arizona, so I didn’t need to do anything other than head to my garage.  It was like an oven!  In addition to having a warm shooting area, white noise does wonders for keeping baby asleep.  I downloaded an app to my iPhone called ‘Sound Sleeper‘ which has a number of soothing sounds that you can play for baby while you are shooting.  I would just tuck my phone underneath the blanket I was shooting on and it would keep Gabriel happy and snoozing!  The third trick probably goes without saying –  but make sure baby has a nice, full belly and is not hungry during your shoot.  In addition to these three things, I have found that most babies (including my own) are much more cooperative and ‘lazy’ in the morning hours than in the afternoon and evening hours.  Try to do your shooting between breakfast and lunch, and I think you will agree that this is the best time for most babies.

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

4. Keep that baby safe!

This goes without saying, but please make sure your baby’s safety is the number 1 priority while you are taking his or her photos.  If you are trying a more difficult pose or working with props, have someone there to help you and to spot baby.  My newborn photography style is simple and organic with more natural posing, so this was not an issue for me.  If you need help from someone, make sure that you ask for it.  My husband has been an excellent spotter in the rare times that I’ve needed one.  Remember that many of the more difficult looking poses and setups are actually composite images, and not created from a single image.

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

5. Tiny details.

Don’t forget to document all of those sweet little details that make your baby unique!  That little upturned nose, her rosebud lips, his crinkly little chin, those tiny toes and fingers – these are all things that you will not want to forget as your baby grows.  If you have a macro lens, now would be the time to pull it out of your bag, dust it off, and put it to good use.  If you are having trouble getting the images you want from your macro lens, here are a few tips.  Close down a bit – when you are working as close-up as you will need to be to do a macro shot, shooting wide open will give you a very small depth of field.  Unless that is what you are going for, try closing down to F-5.6 or even further.  In addition to closing down, take that lens out of auto focus and try using manual focus.  I had much better results with my macro using manual focus!  Do not worry too much about your ISO.  If you need to crank it up to avoid underexposing your images, do not be afraid of doing so.  Experiment and have fun!  When I was shooting Gabriel’s newborn photos, I kept my macro lens sitting on the table next to me so I could easily swap out lenses and snag some macro shots during each of our ‘mini shoots.’  I found this to be much easier than trying to get them all at once.  If you have an extra camera body, you could leave your macro attached to it to easily grab those macro images as you go.  Some things to consider shooting with your macro lens – noses, lips, eyelashes, ears, toes, fingers, belly buttons, hair, fuzzy shoulders – those details will change so fast as your baby grows and this is a wonderful way to preserve those memories.

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

6. Angles and perspectives.

Instead of rushing to change your setup or reposition your baby, try getting up and walking around your baby to see what unique angles you can photograph.  Try walking behind your baby and shoot some pictures from the shadowed side – you may end up with an image that you love!  Exhaust all of your different angles and perspectives before moving on to a new pose or setup.  This is an easy way to get variety out of a single pose.

Gabriel didn’t move an inch between these two shots, but look how different they are!  The first was taken from the front as a nice close-up of his sweet little face and hands.  In the second image, I walked around behind him, loved how the lighting looked, and took another picture from that angle.  It ended up being one of my favorites!

Related: Less is More: Mastering the Minimalist Style of Newborn Photography

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

7. Get outside!

I am an on location photographer and most of my work is done in the great outdoors.  Who says you can’t take a new baby outside too?  Weather permitting, take your baby out of the studio and into nature – you can get some amazingly beautiful and unique newborn photos this way.  I get bored easily and was definitely over blankets and beanbags, so my husband and I took a little drive and did a few images of Gabriel outside.  They are definitely some of my favorites!  Being outside in nature opens up a whole new realm of possibilities and creative freedom that you may not have shooting indoors.  Bring along some simple props to place baby in and have fun!  I have found that many babies tend to sleep more easily outside on a warm day than they would indoors in a studio setting.

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

8. Include your older children.

Some of the sweetest and most endearing photos you can take of your new baby will be the ones you get with his or her older siblings.  I set out a task for myself to get an image of Gabriel with each of his 9 older brothers and sisters.  I still have 2 to go, but I am getting there!  Older children may be able to hold their new brother or sister, while simple laying down poses are perfect for younger children.  This will make your older children feel special and involved as well, which is always a bonus when there is a new baby in the house getting a lot of attention!

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

9. Get in the picture!

I know firsthand how difficult it can be having photos taken of yourself, but please, hand your camera to someone else – your husband, an older child, or a friend – and get a few pictures of yourself with your new baby.  No one cares that you still need to lose your pregnancy weight, or that you are tired, and don’t feel that you are looking your best – just do it.  Trust me.  This will be a priceless treasure for your new baby as he or she grows up.  As photographers, I think it’s safe to say that most of us are more comfortable being on the back side of the camera, but it is so important for our children that we get in front if it once in a while too. 🙂  My 14 year old daughter, Calista, took this image for me, and I absolutely love it!

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

10. Print those pictures out!

Please, for the love of all that is newborn photography, do not leave all of your beautiful newborn photos sitting on your hard drive.  Print those babies out!  I feel a bit hypocritical telling you this, as I myself have been absolutely horrible about printing my own images, but just do it.  Do not wait to design the perfect wall display, or to choose the perfect picture.  If you see a good canvas sale going on, just order something.  You will love it – I promise!  What am I doing with all of Gabriel’s newborn images?  I am making an epic baby album for him, of course.  I cannot wait to order it and have it in my hands!  There is NO substitute for the actual finished product for you and your family to enjoy.  Pictures on a computer screen are nice, but a huge 30×40 canvas hanging in the entryway of your home is even nicer.  Trust me on this. 😉

Related: 6 ways to photograph a newborn after the first 10 days

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

In summary, photographing your own newborn can be challenging but also so very rewarding.  The pictures taken from your perspective – the mother who loves her baby like no other – are going to have a little something extra special about them.  Just take it slow, and be sure to get a lot of rest.  You just had a new baby.  Enjoy your baby!  These days go by so fast – before you know it, they’ll be heading off to school, learning to drive, getting married, and giving you grandbabies.  I’m not even kidding!  It seems like just yesterday I was bringing Clint home from the hospital, and now we are working on a driver’s license.  It goes by in the blink of an eye!

10 tips for photographing your own newborn by Lisa Holloway

While some may opt to hire a professional to photograph their baby, some of us are excited at the prospect of capturing our baby's first days ourselves. I would love to share with you some tips and ideas to help you create beautiful images of your own baby and to make this experience an enjoyable and stress-free one for the both of you.
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